Yummy in the tummy? The Rise of the Baby Food Revolution.

If I had to do it all again, I would have made my own baby food. I never did embark on that particular parent adventure because I thought homemade baby food was for hippies and helicopter moms. Making baby food just seemed cumbersome and unnecessary since I could just buy a few jars during my daily trip to Target. But that was seven years ago and since then baby food sales have been on a steady decline. Why? Because moms are making baby food at home.

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Millennial moms (those born between 1981-1994) research everything from sunscreen to car seats, so it makes perfect sense that we are educating ourselves about what we put into baby’s belly.

“As a new mom it is reassuring to know exactly what is going into your baby’s mouth, and that you had a hand in creating it,” says Touro dietitian Julie Fortenberry, RD, LDN. “Making your own baby food allows you to shop seasonally and locally for fresh, clean foods. It also increases the variety and flavors available to your baby. This all ensures that your precious baby is provided with the peak nutrients essential for growth and development.”

​Making your own baby food is healthier no matter how cute those babies in the commercials are or how sleek the newly designed glass bottle looks. On the other hand, over-the-counter baby food is convenient and because of advancements in technology, the quality and nutrient value in baby food is improving, but you’re going to pay for it.

For example, a jar of Beech-Nut banana baby food is $1.50. The price of one banana is $0.23. This means that for every jar of baby food you buy, you’re paying a convenience fee of $1.27 to Beech-Nut so that it can market its products and pay its shareholders. That’s just the business of it all.

bananacollage

Baby food pouches like Ella’s Kitchen and Happy Baby exploded onto the baby food market in the early 2000s and have since seen significant growth. The pouches are expensive, which balances out declining sales of traditional baby food. Personally, I loved the pouches but because they were expensive, I tried to save them for certain “situations” like shopping at Target with a screaming baby, driving home with a screaming baby, waiting in the check out line with a screaming baby, not to mention our general on-the-go lifestyle. I also hated how wasteful the pouches were; You can’t recycle them.

beabaIf you’re curious about making homemade baby food, here are two great recipes from Touro dietitian Julie Fortenberry, RD, LDN. And be sure to Save-the-Date for a Baby Food Making Class at Touro, where Julie and ZukaBaby owner, Erin Reho Pelias, will host an interactive baby food making class on Thursday, August 7, 2014, from 6-7:30pm. You’ll learn everything you need to know! Register today for this free class. One lucky parent will win a Beaba Pro Baby Food Maker!

RECIPES

Pumpkin Sweet Potato Puree

Broccoli, Pear and Kale Puree

What’s your [child’s] relationship with food? (sponsored)

I have three children. They all have different relationships with food. Anson (6) uses it for fuel, Emmeline (2) uses it to socialize and Catherine (3) uses it for comfort.

When Catherine was a baby, she hated the car. She would scream and squirm. It was painful to my ears and generally very upsetting. To calm her, I would hand her food to nibble on. We both got a little relief.

Something physiological happens to a mother when she hears her baby cry. At some point along the way we, as parents, have decided that it’s not okay for our kids to cry in public or be uncomfortable, and it’s certainly not okay for kids to be disruptive in a store or at the library during story-time. So we feed them. And they’re quiet (or still) and we can grab what we need at the store, or finish our conversation on the phone.

Even now, I’ll grab some snacks to dole out to the girls when I pick them up from school so they won’t kill each other on the two-mile ride home. I do this for my own sanity. I have bribed all of my children with food in exchange for good behavior.

What I didn’t realize at the time, was that by using food to comfort Catherine, I taught her that food is comfort. She is now, at age three, an emotional eater. When she is stressed, bored or upset, she wants to eat. When she is feeling out of control, she heads for the fridge. Many of the tears she sheds are food-related… can’t have, wants more, doesn’t like, all gone, etc. It feels like an endless battle, and food has become a control issue on both sides.

Catherine is not very different from me. I am an emotional eater, too. I don’t know why. Maybe it was one of the few things I could control when I was young– a kid exercising power in a powerless world.

Our adult relationship with food is a direct result of the food habits modeled for us as children. As a mother, I want my daughters to have a healthy relationship with food, but as a woman I know how difficult this can be.

Julie Fortenberry, registered dietitian for Touro, gave me some really helpful insight into understanding the importance of creating healthy eating habits for myself and my children now so they will grow up to be healthy adults. Julie stressed that every child and family is different and there is no one-size-fits-all philosophy or plan, so do what makes sense for your child.

1. Nutrition Awareness

The first step is being aware of the importance of nutrition. As parents, once we know the effects poor nutrition could have on our children’s future, we can start taking it more seriously. Poor nutrition and eating habits can lead to diabetes, obesity, eating disorders, and distorted body image.

Analogy: As parents, there are certain things we insist on teaching our children. Take crossing the street, for example. As soon as they can walk, we start teaching them how to stop at the corner and look both ways. We do this every single time we cross a street and we do it for years until they can do it by themselves. We teach them this because if we don’t, they could get hit by a car. We make them sit in their car seats and booster seats even though they hate it. Why? Because their safety is important to us and by doing so, we create good habits and prolong their lives. Looking both ways and wearing a seatbelt becomes second nature.

Julie points out that nutrition is as important as these other life-long habits that we, as parents, automatically do without thinking. We want to teach them how to be healthy and safe now so that when they are older, they have the foundation to make healthy and safe choices on their own.

2. Self Awareness

If you don’t like how or what your children are eating, look at how or what you are eating. How do you talk about food? Do you crave desert after every meal? Do you emotionally eat? Does food control you? Do you make them eat a healthy meal and then order a pizza for yourself? What foods do you gravitate to? You are the model.

3. Take Inventory

If your child is an emotional eater, pay attention to when and why your child seeks out food. This will give you an idea for what the triggers might be so that you can be proactive.

4. Redirect

If your child eats when she’s bored, redirect her with an activity. If she loves to play outside, take a walk. If that’s not an option, engage her in an activity, chat about the day. Find ways to stimulate her mind and redirect her body. Let her help you make dinner or ask her to set the table.

5. Let Go

Power struggles with children are futile. If a child has a meltdown because she wants more or doesn’t like it, that’s OK. “I know you want more dinner and you are mad. But dinner is over.” “I know you do not like your dinner. It’s OK. You don’t have to eat it, but I will leave it on the table for you if you change your mind.”

6. Healthy Choices

Give your child a healthy option but let him be part of the choosing. That way he feels like he is making a choice. “Do you want oatmeal or eggs?” “For snack do you want apple or cheese?” “I’ve got lean ground beef tonight. Would you like mom to make tacos or spaghetti?”

7. Be Consistent

Once you find something that works, be consistent because that’s how we break bad habits and create good ones. And remember to do this as a family. There is no need to single one person out. All for one and one for all.

From our Sponsor:

Free Monthly Grocery Store Tours with a Touro Nutritionist

Practice Choosing Healthy Foods for Your Family First Hand!

Join Touro Nutritionist Julie Fortenberry for free monthly grocery store tours. Grocery shopping can be a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be! Touro can take the stress away by walking you down and educating you aisle by aisle. Learn to make better food choices, practice reading food labels, learn about ingredients, and ask your nutrition questions along the way.

Learn to shop with your health needs and goals in mind. Good food choices begin in the grocery store!

For upcoming grocery tour dates and times and to register, please visit www.touro.com/events or call (504) 897-8500.

A booger is not a vegetable.

Our family is struggling with food. One of our daughters is addicted to sugar. We do not really have a lot of sugar-like things in our home, so as parents this is a bit confusing for us. It has gotten to the point that she won’t eat anything but will pine all day long for her “fix.”

As someone who has seen first hand the effects of addiction, this behavior is really unsettling to me. I worry about body issues, eating disorders, warped relationships with food, nutrition, control and power. I worry that this is a foreshadowing of future behavior… future addictions.

She’s three, by the way. So yes, maybe these are my issues. Maybe I’m projecting. Maybe I read too much. Maybe I overanalyze. Nevertheless, I haven’t seen my kid consume anything green besides her boogers in a very long time.

booger

My husband and I decided we needed help understanding our daughter’s obsession with sugar and figure out ways to change this behavior, so we scheduled an appointment with one of the parent educators at The Parenting Center at Children’s Hospital. Turns out we are the ones who need to change our behavior. Shocker.

Here are a few eye-opening things we learned in our session:

Instead of this:

We have always used dessert to bribe our kids into eating their dinner/vegetables, which sends the message that dessert is better than broccoli. In order to get the good stuff, you have to eat the bad stuff.

Do this:

Let them decide when to eat dessert by including dessert in the dinner offering. Should they choose to eat their dessert first, that’s fine. Make a comment: “Oh! I see you chose to eat your dessert first! Was it yummy?” The longing for the “fix” is satiated. If they’re still hungry, they can eat the other food in front of them. If all they eat is dessert, then all they eat is dessert. It has no power.

Instead of this:

I prepare each child’s meal using those handy divided dishes. I control what goes on the plate, which sets the stage for a power struggle before dinner even begins.

Do this:

Eat family-style. It’s messier and a lot less organized, but they get to control what they put on their plates and how much. As long as all the choices are acceptable to you, and there is at least one thing on the table (besides the dessert) you know they’ll eat, let them be in control.

Last night, we ate family-style and I placed dessert on the table along with the rest of the meal. Everyone made her own plate. Two of the kids decided to eat dessert first. It was a non-issue. After she slowly, deliberately and joyfully savored her dessert, our little sugar-addict fixed herself a plate and nonchalantly ate her dinner.

Bonus: Because dinner was served family-style, the girls had to ask each other to please pass the chicken/tortillas/cheese/lettuce. They had fun passing each other things. It was messy but it was worth it.

Has food become a power-struggle in your home? How do you handle it?

 

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